Earth science education and workforce : Expert Reports

The division produces 60-70 reports per year. These reports are unique, authoritative expert evaluations. Each report is produced by a committee of experts selected by the Academy to address a particular statement of task and is subject to a rigorous, independent peer review. The experts who volunteer their time participating on study committees are vetted to make sure that the committee has the range of expertise needed to address the task, that they have a balance of perspectives, and to identify and eliminate members with conflicts of interest. All reports undergo a rigorous, independent peer review to assure that the statement of task has been addressed, that conclusions are adequately supported, and that all important issues raised by the reviewers are addressed. Thus, while the reports represent views of the committee, they also are endorsed by the Academy.

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Showing results 1 - 5 of 9

Preparing the Next Generation of Earth Scientists: An Examination of Federal Education and Training Programs (2013)

Federal agencies play a key role in educating the next generation of earth scientists, offering programs that attract students to the field, support them through formal education, or provide training for an earth science career. The report examines 25 federal earth science education programs, describes ways to evaluate the success of these programs, and identifies opportunities for leveraging federal education resources. A centerpiece of th... More >>

Report in Brief

Emerging Workforce Trends in the U.S. Energy and Mining Industries: A Call to Action (2013)

Access to energy and mineral resources is essential to support the United States' high standard of living, economy, and security. Energy in the U.S. comes from a variety of sources, including fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, and coal), nuclear energy, and renewable sources (solar, wind, and geothermal). Nonfuel minerals are necessary for the existence and operation of products and services used by people every day and are provided by the minin... More >>

Report in Brief

Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence (2013)

We live in a changing world with multiple and evolving threats to national security, including terrorism, asymmetrical warfare (conflicts between agents with different military powers or tactics), and social unrest. Visually depicting and assessing these threats using imagery and other geographically-referenced information is the mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). As the nature of the threat evolves, so do the tools... More >>

New Research Opportunities in the Earth Sciences (2011)

A national strategy to sustain basic research and training across all areas of the Earth sciences can help inform many of the most urgent societal issues that will face the planet in coming years. Issues including fossil fuel and water resources, earthquake and tsunami hazards, and profound environmental changes due to shifts in the climate system could all be informed by new research in the Earth sciences. The National Science Foundation'... More >>

Report in Brief

Understanding the Changing Planet: Strategic Directions for the Geographical Sciences (2010)

Earth's surface has been in constant flux throughout time, but in recent decades the pace and extent of human-induced changes has reached unprecedented levels. With Earth's population projected to peak at 8 to 12 billion people by 2050 and the additional stress of climate change, it is more important than ever to understand how and where these changes are occurring.Increasingly, innovation in the geographical sciences is advancing our knowledg... More >>

Report in Brief