Committee Membership Information

Study Title:

Science for EPA's Future

Study Director:


Dr. Jerald L. Schnoor - (Chair)
The University of Iowa

Jerald L. Schnoor, chair, is the Allen S. Henry Chair in Engineering, professor of civil and environmental engineering, professor of occupational and environmental health, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, and faculty research engineer for the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research - Hydroscience and Engineering. Dr. Schnoor???s interests are in the areas of water quality modeling, environmental chemistry, and climate change. His present research includes phytoremediation of groundwater contamination and hazardous wastes, water observatory networks, global change, and sustainability. Dr. Schnoor is editor-in-chief of Environmental Science and Technology (American Chemical Society). He is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and councilor on the National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council of National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. He has served on several previous National Research Council committees, and he is currently a member of the Committee on Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increasing Biofuels Production. Dr. Schnoor earned a PhD in civil (environmental health) engineering from the University of Texas.


Dr. David E. Liddle
U.S. Venture Partners

David E. Liddle joined U.S. Venture Partners as a general partner in 2000 after retiring as president and chief executive officer of Interval Research Corporation, a laboratory and new business incubator in Silicon Valley, California. He has spent his career developing technologies for interaction and communication between people and computers in activities spanning research, development, management, and entrepreneurship. Prior to co-founding Interval, Dr. Liddle founded Metaphor Computer Systems in 1982 and served as its president and chief executive officer. The company was acquired by IBM in 1991, and Dr. Liddle was named vice president of new systems business development. Previously, he held various research and development positions at Xerox Corporation's Palo Alto Research Center. Dr. Liddle has served as director of numerous public and private companies and as chair of the board of trustees of the Santa Fe Institute. He has served on the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Information Science and Technology Committee and has participated in several National Research Council committees, including as chair of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, member of the Committee on Innovation in Information Technology, and chair of the Committee to Study Wireless Technology Prospects and Policy. He has been named a senior fellow at the Royal College of Art and elected as a director of the New York Times Company. Dr. Liddle earned a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Toledo.


Dr. Steven P. Hamburg
Environmental Defense Fund

Steven P. Hamburg is chief scientist at Environmental Defense Fund. He is an ecosystem ecologist specializing in the impacts of disturbance on forest structure and function. He has served as an advisor to both corporations and non-governmental organizations on ecological and climate change mitigation issues. Previously, he spent 16 years as a tenured member of the Brown University faculty and was founding director of the Global Environment Program at the Watson Institute for International Studies. Dr. Hamburg is the co-chair of the Royal Society???s Solar Radiation Management Governance Initiative and a member of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Advisory Committee on Research, Economics, Extension and Education. He has been the recipient of several awards, including recognition by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as contributing to its award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. Hamburg earned a PhD in forest ecology from Yale University.


Dr. Thomas A. Burke
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Thomas A. Burke is associate dean for public health practice and professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He holds joint appointments in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and the School of Medicine???s Department of Oncology. Dr. Burke is also director of the Johns Hopkins Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute. His research interests include environmental epidemiology and surveillance, evaluation of population exposures to environmental pollutants, assessment and communication of environmental risks, and application of epidemiology and health risk assessment to public policy. Before joining Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Burke was deputy commissioner of health for New Jersey and director of science and research for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. In New Jersey, he directed initiatives that influenced the development of national programs, such as Superfund, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Toxics Release Inventory. Dr. Burke was the inaugural chair of the advisory board to the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health and is currently a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board. He has served on several NRC committees, most recently as chair of the Committee on Improving Risk Analysis Approaches Used by the U.S. EPA and the Committee to Review EPA???s Title 42 Hiring Authority for Highly Qualified Scientists and Engineers. He was also chair of the Committee on Human Biomonitoring for Environmental Toxicants and the Committee on Toxicants and Pathogens in Biosolids Applied to Land. In 2003, he was designated a lifetime national associate of the National Academies. Dr. Burke received his PhD in epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania.


Dr. Joel A. Tickner
University of Massachusetts

Joel A. Tickner is an associate professor in the Department of Community Health and Sustainability at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. He is interested in the development of innovative scientific methods and policies to implement a precautionary and preventive approach to decision-making under uncertainty, while advancing assessment and adoption of safer substitutes to chemicals and products of concern. His areas of teaching and research interests include regulatory science and policy, risk assessment, pollution prevention, cleaner production, and environmental health. Dr. Tickner has served on several advisory boards and as an expert reviewer, most recently for the California Green Chemistry Initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Pollution Prevention and Toxics Advisory Committee, and the First National Precautionary Principle Conference Advisory Committee. He is the recipient of several honors and awards, including the University of Massachusetts President???s Award for Public Service, the National Pollution Prevention Routable Champion Award, and the North American Hazardous Waste Managers Policy Leader Award. Dr. Tickner earned an ScD in cleaner production and pollution prevention from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell.


Dr. Yiliang Zhu
University of South Florida

Yiliang Zhu is professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of South Florida College of Public Health. He is also director of the college???s Center for Collaborative Research. His current research is focused on biostatistical methods for spatiotemportal data, exposure to environmental contaminants and health consequences, evaluation of healthcare systems and outcomes, and quantitative methodologies in health risk assessment, including physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models, dose-response modeling, benchmark dose methods, and uncertainty quantification. He also conducts research in disease surveillance and healthcare access and utilization in developing countries. Dr. Zhu has served as a member of the National Research Council Committees on EPA???s Exposure and Human Health Assessment of Dioxin and Related Compounds, the Committee on Tetrachloroethylene, and the Committee to Review EPA???s Draft IRIS Assessment on Formaldehyde. He received his PhD in statistics from the University of Toronto.


Mr. Daniel S. Greenbaum
Health Effects Institute

Daniel S. Greenbaum is president and chief executive officer of the Health Effects Institute (HEI), an independent research institute funded jointly by government and industry. In this role, he leads HEI???s efforts to provide public and private decision makers with high quality, impartial, relevant, and credible science about the health effects of air pollution to inform air quality decisions in the developed and developing world. Mr. Greenbaum has focused HEI???s efforts on providing timely and critical research and reanalysis on particulate matter, air toxics, diesel exhaust, and alternative technologies and fuels. Prior to joining HEI, he served as commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Mr. Greenbaum has chaired the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline and EPA???s Clean Diesel Independent Review Panel, and he is a member of the board of directors of the Environmental Law Institute. He has also served on several National Research Council committees, most recently the Committee on Health, Environmental, and Other External Costs and Benefits of Energy Production and Consumption and the Committee on Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction Benefits from Decreasing Tropospheric Ozone Exposure. Mr. Greenbaum earned an MS in city planning from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Dr. Jana B. Milford
University of Colorado at Boulder

Jana B. Milford is professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Colorado. She previously served as a senior staff member with the Environmental Defense Fund. Her research addresses technical, legal, and policy aspects of air pollution. Her primary technical focus is modeling the chemistry and transport of ozone, secondary organic aerosols, and other photochemical air pollutants. Her research includes application of formal sensitivity and uncertainty analysis and optimization techniques to chemistry and transport models, and use of these models in making decisions. She is also interested in application and evaluation of statistical and mass balance techniques for identifying sources of air pollution based on chemically speciated measurements, including outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure measurements. She has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Air Quality Management in the United States, and is currently a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Milford obtained a PhD from the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and a law degree (JD) from the University of Colorado School of Law.


Dr. Frank W. Davis
University of California, Santa Barbara

Frank W. Davis is a professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he teaches ecology and conservation planning. His current research focuses on the landscape ecology of California rangelands, ecological implications of modern climate change, and conservation planning for renewable energy development. Between 1995 and 1999, he served as the deputy director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. Dr. Davis is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, a Google Science Communication Fellow, and a trustee of the Nature Conservancy of California. He has served on several National Research Council committees and is currently a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Davis earned a PhD in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University.


Dr. James S. Shortle
Pennsylvania State University

James S. Shortle is a distinguished professor of agricultural and environmental economics and director of the Environment and Natural Resources Institute at Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on markets and incentives for ecosystem services with a goal of advancing theory and practice. He is also interested in the use of integrated assessment for environmental decision-making to improve capacity to predict, manage, and adapt to environmental change. Dr. Shortle has served on the editorial boards of Environment and Development Economics and European Review of Agricultural Economics. He has served as member and secretary of the National Technical Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of Energy National Initiative on Global Environmental Change, as a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) Panel on the Second Generation Model, and as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Water Quality in the Pittsburgh Region, and he is currently a member of the EPA SAB Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. Dr. Shortle earned a PhD in economics from Iowa State University.


Dr. Tina Bahadori
American Chemistry Council

Tina Bahadori is the managing director for the Long-Range Research Initiative (LRI) program at the American Chemistry Council. She is responsible for the direction of the LRI, which sponsors an independent research program that advances the science of risk assessment for the health and ecological effects of chemicals to support decision-making by government, industry, and the public. Prior to joining the American Chemistry Council, she was the manager of Air Quality Health Integrated Programs at the Electric Power Research Institute. Dr. Bahadori is the immediate past president of the International Society of Exposure Science and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. She serves as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) / Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR); peer reviewer for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grants and programs; a member of the Chemical Exposure Working Group on the National Children???s Study; and a member of the CDC NCEH/ATSDR National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposure Leadership Council. She has also served on several National Research Council committees and is currently a member of the Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials, the Committee on Human and Environmental Exposure Science in the 21st Century, and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Bahadori earned an ScD in environmental science and engineering from the Harvard School of Public Health.


Dr. James E. Hutchison
University of Oregon

James E. Hutchison is the Lokey-Harrington Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oregon. He is the founding director of the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute???s Safer Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Initiative, a virtual center that unites 30 principal investigators across the northwest around the goals of designing greener nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing. Dr. Hutchison???s research focuses on molecular-level design and synthesis of functional surface coatings and nanomaterials for a wide range of applications, where the design of new processes and materials draws heavily on the principles of green chemistry. Dr. Hutchison received several awards and honors including the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Career Award. He was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Grand Challenges for Sustainability in the Chemistry Industry and he is currently a member of the Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials. Dr. Hutchison received a PhD in organic chemistry from Stanford University.


Dr. Melvin E. Andersen
The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences

Melvin E. Andersen is director for the Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences at The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences. His career work has focused on computational approaches for dose response and human health risk assessments for environmental chemicals. Before joining The Hamner, he held positions at Colorado State University, ICF Kaiser International Consulting, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology. Dr. Andersen is a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences and a diplomat of the American Board of Toxicology and the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. He has received several awards for his work, including the Frank R. Blood Achievement Award and Arnold J. Lehman Award (Society of Toxicology), the Herbert Stokinger Award (American Conference of Industrial Hygienists), the Kenneth Morgareidge Award (International Life Sciences Institute), and the George Scott Award (Toxicology Forum). He has served on numerous National Research Council Committees, including the Committee on Toxicity Testing and Assessment of Environmental Agents and the Committee on Toxicology. Dr. Andersen earned a PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology from Cornell University.


Dr. Paul Gilman
Covanta Energy Corporation

Paul Gilman is senior vice president and chief sustainability officer for Covanta Energy. Previously, he served as director of the Oak Ridge Center for Advanced Studies and as assistant administrator for research and development in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He also worked in the Office of Management and Budget, where he had oversight responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and all other science agencies. In DOE, he advised the secretary of energy on scientific and technical matters. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Gilman was the executive director of the Commission on Life Sciences and the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources of the National Research Council (NRC). He has served on numerous NRC committees and is currently a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Committee on Incorporating Sustainability in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Committee on Human and Environmental Exposure Science in the 21st Century. Dr. Gilman received his PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from Johns Hopkins University.


Dr. David L. Eaton
University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine

David L. Eaton is a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences and interim vice provost for research at the University of Washington (UW). He also serves as the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health at UW. He has previously held several other UW positions, including toxicology program director and associate chairman in the Department of Environmental Health and associate dean for research in the School of Public Health. Dr. Eaton maintains an active research and teaching program that is focused on the molecular basis for environmental causes of cancer and how human genetic differences in biotransformation enzymes may increase or decrease individual susceptibility to chemicals found in the environment. He has published over 150 scientific articles and book chapters in the field of toxicology and risk assessment. Nationally, he has served on the board of directors and as treasurer of the American Board of Toxicology, as secretary and later as president of the Society of Toxicology, as a member of the board of directors and as vice-president of the Toxicology Education Foundation, and as a member of the board of trustees of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Eaton has served on several National Academies committees and is currently a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment: The Scientific Evidence, Research Methodology, and Future Directions. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Eaton earned a PhD in pharmacology from the University of Kansas Medical Center.


Dr. M. Granger Morgan
Carnegie Mellon University

M. Granger Morgan is professor and head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and University and Lord Chair Professor in Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. In addition, he holds academic appointments in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and in the H. John Heinz III College. His research addresses problems in science, technology, and public policy with a particular focus on energy, environmental systems, climate change, and risk analysis. Much of his work has involved the development and demonstration of methods to characterize and treat uncertainty in quantitative policy analysis. At Carnegie Mellon, Dr. Morgan directs the National Science Foundation Climate Decision Making Center and co-directs the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. Dr. Morgan serves as chair of the Scientific and Technical Council for the International Risk Governance Council. In the recent past, he served as chair of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board and as chair of the Electric Power Research Institute Advisory Council. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Society for Risk Analysis. He is a member of the National Academies of Sciences and currently serves on the National Academies Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, the Division Committee on Engineering and Physical Sciences, and the Report Review Committee. Dr. Morgan earned a PhD in applied physics from the University of California, San Diego.


Dr. Gordon H. Orians
University of Washington [Retired]

Gordon H. Orians is professor emeritus of biology at the University of Washington (UW). He was a professor at UW from 1960 to 1995, and was director of the UW Institute for Environmental Studies from 1976 to 1986. Most of Dr. Orians??? research has focused on behavioral ecology of birds, and has dealt primarily with problems of habitat selection, mate selection and mating systems, selection of prey and foraging patches, and the relationship between ecology and social organization. Recently, his research has focused on environmental aesthetics and the evolutionary roots of strong emotional responses to components of the environment, such as landscapes, flowers, sunsets, and sounds. Dr. Orians has served on the Science Advisory Board at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and on boards of environmental organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund and the Nature Conservancy. He has also served on many National Academies committees, including the Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, the Committee on Cumulative Environmental Effects of Alaskan North Slope Oil and Gas Activities, and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Orians earned a PhD in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley.


Dr. Eric J. Beckman
University of Pittsburgh

Eric J. Beckman is the George M. Bevier Professor of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. He is also co-director of the Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, a center within the school of engineering that focuses on the design of sustainable communities. Dr. Beckman???s research interests involve the design of green chemical products and molecular design of biomedical devices. Dr. Beckman was honored as the 1992 recipient of the National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award and the 2002 Academic Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award. He earned a PhD in polymer science from the University of Massachusetts.


Mr. Anthony D. Williams
Anthony D. Williams Consulting

Anthony D. Williams is founder and chief executive of Anthony D. Williams Consulting. He is an author, speaker, and consultant who helps organizations harness the power of collaborative innovation in business, government, and society. He is the co-author of Wikinomics and the follow-up book MacroWikinomics: Rebooting the Business and the World. Mr. Williams is currently a visiting fellow with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and a senior fellow for innovation with the Lisbon Council in Brussels. Among other appointments, he is also an advisor to GovLoop, the world???s largest social network for government innovators, and a founding fellow of the OpenForum Academy, a global research initiative focused on understanding the impact of open standards and open sources on business and society. As a senior fellow at nGenera Insight, Mr. Anthony previously founded and led the world???s definitive investigation into the impact of Web 2.0 and wikinomics on the future of governance and democracy. He has advised both Fortune 500 firms and international institutions, including the World Bank. Mr. Williams earned an MSc in research in political science from the London School of Economics.


Dr. Ana Navas-Acien
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Ana Navas-Acien is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is a physician-epidemiologist with a specialty in preventive medicine and public health, and a long-term interest in the health consequences of widespread environmental exposures. Based on an epidemiologic approach, her research investigates chronic health effects of arsenic, selenium, lead, cadmium, and other trace metals. Dr. Navas-Acien has served as an expert witness to the Baltimore City Council and she has served as a member of the 2010 National Toxicology Program Workshop on the Role of Environmental Chemicals in the Development of Diabetes and Obesity. She earned an MD from the University of Granada School of Medicine in Spain and a PhD in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.


Dr. Joan B. Rose
Michigan State University

Joan B. Rose serves as the Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research at Michigan State University, the co-director of the Center for Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment, and the director of the Center for Water Sciences. She is an international expert in water microbiology, water quality, and public health safety with over 300 publications. Dr. Rose???s work has examined new molecular methods for waterborne pathogens and zoonotic agents and source tracking techniques. She has been involved in the study of water supplies, water used for food production, and coastal environments, as well as drinking water treatment, wastewater treatment, reclaimed water, and water reuse. She has been instrumental in advancing quantitative microbial risk assessment. She was awarded the international Clarke Water Prize for contributions to water science and technology in 2001 and the International Water Association (IWA) Woman in Science award in 2008 and is currently a member of the Strategic Council for the IWA. She had served as chair of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Drinking Water Committee. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on several National Academies committees, most recently the Planning Committee for Water Challenges for Public Health Needs Domestically and Internationally: A Workshop, the Committee on Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water, and the Panel on Human Health and Security. Dr. Rose earned a PhD in microbiology from the University of Arizona.


Dr. Jonathan I. Levy
Boston University School of Public Health

Jonathan I. Levy is a professor of environmental health at Boston University School of Public Health. Dr. Levy's research centers on developing models to quantitatively assess the environmental and health impacts of air pollution, from local to national scales, with a focus on urban environments and variability in exposures and risks. Current research efforts include developing methods for cumulative risk assessment, focusing on neurodevelopmental and cardiovascular risks in a low-income community near a Superfund site; developing a discrete event simulation model of environmental exposures and pediatric asthma; and evaluating the exposure and health risk implications of aviation-related emissions. Dr. Levy was the recipient of the Walter A. Rosenblith New Investigator Award from the Health Effects Institute in 2005. He is currently a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Health Impact Assessment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis, and has previously served as a member of the NRC Committee on Improving Risk Analysis Approaches Used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the NRC Committee on the Effects of Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants. Dr. Levy earned his ScD in environmental science and risk management from the Harvard School of Public Health.