Committee Membership Information

Study Title:

Nutrient Requirements of Swine (Eleventh Revised Edition)

Study Director:


Dr. L. Lee Southern - (Chair)
Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

L. Lee Southern holds the Doyle Chambers Distinguished Professorship in the School of Animal Sciences at Louisiana State University (LSU) Agricultural Center. Dr. Southern specializes in nonruminant nutrition; specifically, his research is in the areas of amino acid and mineral utilization by swine and poultry. Dr. Southern has served on the editorial board of Poultry Science and the Professional Animal Scientist and as Associate Editor and Division Editor of the Journal of Animal Science. He is currently serving as Section Editor of Poultry Science. He served as a member of the NRC Committee on Animal Nutrition from 1998 to 2002. Dr. Southern has received numerous awards for his professional accomplishments, including the American Feed Industry Association?s Nonruminant Nutrition Award from the American Society of Animal Science, the Gamma Sigma Delta Research Award, and the LSU Teaching Merit Honor Role. Dr. Southern received his B.S. and M.S. in animal science from North Carolina State University and his Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Illinois.


Dr. Jack Odle
North Carolina State University

Jack Odle holds the William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professorship in nutritional biochemistry at North Carolina State University. Dr. Odle?s research has focused on neonatal nutrition and metabolism, particularly the developmental aspects of lipid digestion, absorption, and metabolism at the molecular, cellular, and whole-animal levels. His other research interests include effects of dietary carnitine and medium-chain triglycerides on growth and the effects of bioactive peptides and polyunsaturated fatty acids on development of the neonatal intestine. Dr. Odle has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of Nutrition and as an elected counselor of the American Society for Nutrition. He has received the American Feed Industry Association?s Nonruminant Nutrition Award from the American Society of Animal Science. Dr. Odle received his B.S. in animal science from Purdue University, M.S. in animal nutrition from the University of Wisconsin, and Ph.D. in nutritional sciences and animal science from the University of Wisconsin.


Dr. Cornelis F. M. de Lange
University of Guelph

Cornelis F. M. de Lange is a professor in the Department of Animal Sciences and director of the Livestock Research Program at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Before his appointment at the University of Guelph, he worked in the commercial feed industry and in applied swine nutrition research. At the University of Guelph, his research aims to support growth of sustainable pork production systems. His specific projects focus on nutrient utilization in growing-finishing pigs, dietary means to reduce the negative impact of pig production on the environment, improving pork meat quality, and enhancing gut health and development in newly weaned piglets. Dr. de Lange is the recipient of the Distinguished Extension Award and the Distinguished Researcher Award, both from the Ontario Agricultural College. Dr. de Lange received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in animal science from the Agricultural University in Wageningen, the Netherlands, and his Ph.D. in animal nutrition from the University of Alberta, Canada.


Dr. Hans H. Stein
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Hans H. Stein is an associate professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on the digestion, absorption, and utilization of energy and macronutrients of feed ingredients, as well as digestive physiology, feed ingredient evaluation, and nutrient management. His honors include the Pork Information Partner Award and the Research Award from Gamma Sigma Delta. He serves on several national committees, including the Nonantimicrobials Working Group and the Animal Science Committee, both of the National Pork Board, and the editorial board of the Journal of Animal Science. He received a Green Diploma in Agriculture (Farmer?s Licence) from the Farmer?s Agricultural School in Graasten, Denmark, his M.S. in animal science from the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in Denmark, and Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Illinois.


Dr. Gretchen M. Hill
Michigan State University

Gretchen M. Hill is a professor in the Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University. Her research seeks to increase understanding of the role of trace element nutrition in livestock, from basic nutrient utilization and conservation to the molecular level. She works closely with the feed industry to revise mineral inclusion rates appropriate for today?s genetics. Dr. Hill has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry and as Associate Editor of the Journal of Animal Science. She received the award for Outstanding Advisor in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State University and the American Feed Industry Association?s Nonruminant Nutrition Award from the American Society of Animal Science. Dr. Hill received her B.S. from the University of Kentucky, M.S. from Purdue University, and Ph.D. in animal nutrition from Michigan State University.


Dr. Brian J. Kerr
Agricultural Research Service

Brian J. Kerr is an Animal Scientist/Lead Scientist of the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s (USDA) Enhanced Animal Production Systems to Increase Natural Resource Utilization and Reduce Environmental Impact Research Unit in Ames, Iowa. Dr. Kerr is responsible for the administrative and scientific functions of a research unit whose mission is focused on reduction of nutrient excretion, emission of malodorous compounds, and release of pathogenic organisms from swine production into the environment. Before his current position, Dr. Kerr was research director at a feed ingredient company and a technical manager at a regional feed company. He has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of Animal Science and on the editorial boards of other publications. Dr. Kerr received his B.S. in animal science and M.S. and Ph.D. in nonruminant nutrition from the University of Illinois.


Dr. Nathalie L. Trottier
Michigan State University

Nathalie L. Trottier is an associate professor in the Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University. Her research interests involve amino acid metabolism during growth and lactation, including investigation of mechanisms of amino acid utilization by the gut and the mammary gland. She is the Research Editor for Michigan State University?s Equine Program Newsletter and has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Animal Science. She is currently serving as the American Editor of the nonruminant nutrition section for the international ANIMAL Journal. Dr. Trottier received her B.S. in agronomy at McGill University in Canada, M.S. in animal nutrition at McGill University, and Ph.D. in animal nutrition at the University of Illinois.


Dr. Olayiwola Adeola
Purdue University

Olayiwola Adeola is a professor of animal sciences at Purdue University, where he teaches nonruminant nutrition, emphasizing amino acid nutrition and utilization of plant minerals. Dr. Adeola's research program objective is the development of strategies to enhance production efficiency and promote better health, and sound environmental stewardship. A primary goal of his research is to improve the efficiency of lean meat production and to minimize the flow of potentially detrimental levels of dietary nutrients from animal waste into the environment. Dr. Adeola has served on the editorial board of Poultry Science, as Associate Editor of the Journal of Animal Science, and as Section Editor of the Canadian Journal of Animal Science. He is a recipient of the Poultry Nutrition Research Award from the American Feed Industry Association, the Maple Leaf Farms Duck Research Award from the Poultry Science Association, and the American Feed Industry Association?s Nonruminant Nutrition Award from the American Society of Animal Science. Dr. Adeola received his B.S. in animal science from the University of Ife, Nigeria and his M.S. and Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Guelph, Canada.


Dr. Merlin D. Lindemann
University of Kentucky

Merlin D. Lindemann is a professor of swine nutrition and management in the Department of Animal and Food Sciences at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Lindemann?s research areas include dietary modifications of nitrogen and phosphorus related to performance and waste management, determination of the feeding value of new byproduct feeds, evaluation of trace minerals for swine, and the effect of supplements on reproductive performance. Dr. Lindemann has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of Animal Science and on the editorial board of the Professional Animal Scientist. He received the American Feed Industry Association?s Nonruminant Nutrition Award from the American Society of Animal Science and the University of Kentucky George E. Mitchell Jr. Award for Outstanding Faculty Service to Graduate Students. Dr. Lindemann received his B.S. and Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Minnesota.


Dr. Phillip S. Miller
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Phillip S. Miller is a professor of swine nutrition in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Nebraska. Dr. Miller is responsible for conducting swine nutrition research focused on interrelationships among liver metabolism, nutrient intake, and growth criteria in growing-finishing barrows and gilts and research in nutritional energetics and body composition. He has served as Associate Editor and Division Editor of the Journal of Animal Science. He has won numerous awards for his teaching, including the Gamma Sigma Delta Teaching Award of Merit and the L. K. Crowe Outstanding Undergraduate Advisor Award. Dr. Miller received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of California, Davis.