Crop Protection: Expert Reports

The division produces 60-70 reports per year. These reports are unique, authoritative expert evaluations. Each report is produced by a committee of experts selected by the Academy to address a particular statement of task and is subject to a rigorous, independent peer review. The experts who volunteer their time participating on study committees are vetted to make sure that the committee has the range of expertise needed to address the task, that they have a balance of perspectives, and to identify and eliminate members with conflicts of interest. All reports undergo a rigorous, independent peer review to assure that the statement of task has been addressed, that conclusions are adequately supported, and that all important issues raised by the reviewers are addressed. Thus, while the reports represent views of the committee, they also are endorsed by the Academy.

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Showing results 1 - 5 of 11

Evaluation of the Updated Site-Specific Risk Assessment for the National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas (2012)

The updated site-specific risk assessment for the National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility is a substantial improvement over the original 2010 site-specific risk assessment, but is still inadequate in fully characterizing the risks associated with operating a high biocontainment facility in Manhattan, Kansas. Many of the shortcomings identified in a 2010 National Research Council report have been addressed in this updated assessment and mor... More >>

Report in Brief

The Use and Storage of Methyl Isocyanate at Bayer CropScience (2012)

The use of hazardous chemicals such as methyl isocyanate can be a significant concern to the residents of communities adjacent to chemical facilities, but is often an integral, necessary part of the chemical manufacturing process. In order to ensure that chemical manufacturing takes place in a manner that is safe for workers, members of the local community, and the environment, the philosophy of inherently safer processing can be used t... More >>

Report in Brief

Strategic Planning for the Florida Citrus Industry: Addressing Citrus Greening (2010)

Among the many citrus diseases to have invaded Florida, citrus greening disease presents the greatest threat to Florida's $9.3 billion citrus industry. Citrus greening, also known as huanglongbing or HLB, reduces yield and compromises the flavor, color, and size of citrus fruit before eventually killing the citrus tree. Caused by an insect-spread bacterial infection, citrus greening infects every type of citrus and is now present in all 3... More >>

Report in Brief

Review of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plan Health Inspection Service Response to Petitions to Reclassify the Light Brown Apple Moth as a Non-Actionable Pest: A Letter Report (2009)

The light brown apple moth, a native of Australia discovered in California in 2006, is a moth that eats many kinds of plants. In 2007 in a pre-emptive effort against potential damage the moth might cause, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) classified the moth as an "actionable quarantine-significant pest" and implemented a program of quarantine restrictions and eradication. However, severa... More >>

Letter Report to the Florida Department of Citrus on the Review of Research Proposals on Citrus Greening (2008)

Citrus Greening has emerged as a major threat to citrus production in Florida. The disease, which is spread by an insect, can infect and kill trees within a few years; currently, there is no cure. To address this devastating disease, the Florida Citrus Production Research Advisory Council and the Florida Department of Citrus together established a research grants program that supports innovative research leading to solutions for Citrus Greenin... More >>